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Julien’s Auctions, the world–record breaking auction house, has announced the full lineup of their two day blockbuster, music auction event of the season taking place on May 18

Julien's Auctions/Supplied by WENN.com
Julien’s Auctions, the world–record breaking auction house, has announced the full lineup of their two day blockbuster, music auction event of the season taking place on May 18 | Hollywood.com
A 1968 prototype solid rosewood Fender Telecaster electric guitar made for Elvis Presley by luthier Phil Kubicki at the Fender Custom Shop.
The guitar has a two-piece neck, without the “skunk stripe” seen on actual production models. The body of the guitar is joined in the center, unlike later models that were cut in half and chambered to decrease the weight of the guitar. No serial number is present; however, a zero is written in yellow crayon on the neck heel where a serial number would normally appear. Additionally, the neckplate bears the registration number 241177. The pickguard, which accompanies the guitar, is incised on the back “Elvis/ Presley/ 1968.”
It is believed that between six and nine of these prototypes were made and given to musicians, notably to George Harrison, who used his prototype to record Let It Be and Abbey Road, and he played it during The Beatles’ 1969 rooftop concert. Another prototype was rumored to have been given to Jimi Hendrix. But the very first prototype was sent to Elvis Presley.
The guitar is accompanied by a letter from Ed Miller, Fender’s Nashville artists’ representative, dated September 16, 1969; a letter from drummer Hal Blaine; and a letter from Harold Bradley of the Nashville Association of Musicians. Presley found the guitar too heavy to be useful for his performances and returned the guitar to Miller, who then sold the guitar to composer Scotty Turner.
Los Angeles, California, United States